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What do guys want to know about periods

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My school's take on period education was to lead all the girls into a separate room from the boys and pull a monstrously large maxi pad out of a cupboard. The thing was like an absorbent surfboard. My best friend and I looked at each other in horror as it got passed around the room for everyone to see. Once it had done the rounds, our teacher filled an egg cup with red paint and dumped it onto the surfboard. Since only the girls received this very thorough education, who knows what the boys grew up understanding about periods? The fact that some grown men—and even some women—are still squeamish about them says: not a lot.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Go with the flow: What guys want to know about periods

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Things to know about Periods (for guys)

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Perhaps not entirely surprisingly, there's a lot of misinformation out there when it comes to periods. And though you might expect that men would be the only ones that are sometimes misinformed, women can also believe in period myths, particularly if they were passed down from old sisters, moms, aunts, or grandmothers who learned them before them. Still, there are some surprising things men think about periods , potentially because, all too often, they're never really taught about periods , as a study published in the Journal of Family Issues found.

They just pick information up wherever they can find it, be it from siblings, parents, friends, or romantic partners. So it's not always their fault when they don't understand every little detail. But some also probably should know more than they do, and part of that is setting the record straight on some of the more pervasive period myths, especially ones that men, in particular, seem to believe to be true.

If you're a man with close relationships with someone who gets a period, whether that be a sibling, best friend, romantic partner, roommate, or coworker, you may have, in the past, said something about periods to that person that wasn't exactly right or was something that seemed a bit outlandish to the person hearing it.

And if they corrected you or reacted strongly, you may have felt a bit embarrassed. But it's still important for everyone to separate period fact from fiction. And some of the things that men seem to ardently believe about periods falls firmly into the fiction category.

Some men seem to believe that women can somehow control the flow of their period, saying things like, 'can't you just hold it? I've had this kind of conversation on more than one occasion, myself, in which they didn't understand why it was so urgent to track down a tampon or get to the bathroom to make a change.

The fact of the matter is, that's just not how periods work, unfortunately. People who experience a tampon or other leak or spotting on their pants don't want that to happen — in fact, it can be sort of embarrassing, just as when you stain any other part of your clothes for any reason.

It's not something they can control. Some people also believe that periods can attract wild animals like bears and sharks. In a post that she penned for Scientific American , Dr.

Kate Clancy, an assistant professor of anthropology at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, wrote that she received a question about periods and wildlife when she was a guest on the podcast Skeptically Speaking, so she decided to look into it more.

It's also an idea that I've heard thrown around and debated by men and women in the past. The National Parks Service has concluded that there's not actually any evidence that a bear might be attracted to the scent of period blood. Plus, Clancy concluded that part of this debate might stem from the way society sees and explains menstruation and some cultural issues more generally — if wildlife is attracted to periods, that's why women weren't the hunters in the past.

It likely isn't something that you need to be overly concerned about. But if you're worried, using tampons is just one way that you can potentially help avoid any potential for a situation like that.

Some men think that PMS and periods are sort of one in the same, so that you're bleeding and PMS-ing at the same time.

That's not exactly how it works. Teen Vogue asked Dr. Kameelah A. Phillips explained that since PMS stands for premenstrual syndrome, it actually comes before your period — typically about a week or two before. Once you have your period, it's not PMS anymore. In a piece she wrote for The Atlantic , writer Cari Romm noted that someone in college asked her if menstrual cycles are tied to the moon , which, as it turns out, is something that more than just that one guy think. I've also been asked that.

It's not a dumb question, however, because the length of these cycles are about the same, so it's easy to understand why people men and women might think this. But, as a blog post on Clue's website noted, when you look at the data, there's not actually an association between lunar phases and when your period starts. Maybe it's because of how tampons look, but some men think that they function, essentially, as a stopper would in a bath tub, as a Buzzfeed Community user shared with the site.

That's just not the case. Your flow can change over the course of your period, sometimes being heavier, and sometimes super light. Some people think that you can have unprotected sex while you're on your period without getting pregnant, but that's actually a common misconception. It's something that I've heard repeated by people before and a period-related question that men asked Vice UK. So, it's possible that ovulation will happen quickly enough you have sex that sperm will still be around, and that can result in a pregnancy.

Some men also seem to think that everyone who gets a period experiences the same symptoms — and deals with them in the same way — which is definitely not true. Just because your older sister never seemed to experience cramps doesn't mean that your partner curled up on the couch in agony is exaggerating. I've heard guys express surprise at one period symptom or another or the severity of symptoms because they hadn't heard about or seen that kind of period experience before.

Period symptoms can even change over time , as Redbook reported. One month you might notice that you're dealing with back pain or breast tenderness, but when you were younger, cramps were a bigger deal. It's OK if men don't understand all the ins and outs of periods automatically, but knowing what's true and what's not can help you understand what people who get periods are going through each month and also just be better informed in general.

Editor's note: This article has been updated from it's original version.

We Answered 12 Common Questions Guys Have About Periods

How do you explain periods to men? Sanitary pads. Vagina bleeding — just a list of words that when mentioned are guaranteed to make men shift uncomfortably in their seats. Despite the increasing societal pressure to eliminate the stigma associated with the concept of menstruation, many men are still uncomfortable discussing the subject, even in homes and relationships. Here is the reality — most people with a uterus that you know will spend about 40 years menstruating.

Melissa K. Ochoa does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. Are you ever around women who seem frustrated, upset or irritated?

In college, I had a male friend who once asked me if menstrual cycles had anything to do with the moon. A lot of my female friends have stories like these. One of them knows a guy who thought women could choose to begin bleeding the way people choose when to go to the bathroom. Another friend met a man at a bar who, after spotting a pad in her open purse, asked her if it was hard for women to poop during their periods.

Men Have Questions About Periods, and We Answered Them

Yes, we can bleed for five days without dying. A period is nothing to be ashamed of. Personally, I'm proud of my period. It makes me a strong, healthy woman, and it reminds me how incredibly strong and powerful I am. Men, get yourselves informed. Sometimes we convince ourselves we're pregnant when we aren't, so stop freaking out because it only freaks us out more. So, stop doing that.

6 Things Men Should Really Know About Periods By Now

Skip navigation! Story from Body. Alice Casely-Hayford. Most women will menstruate to times in their lives, yet most men are still pretty perplexed by periods. As young girls, we are educated by mothers, aunts, sisters, friends, teachers and magazines about our monthly cycles but the majority of men plod through life none the wiser about something that affects all of the women they know.

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When was the last time you talked to your friends about period sex? The act has long been taboo as far as American culture is concerned. It's rarely depicted in TV or movies beyond women rolling over in bed and complaining of cramps. The infamous "tampon scene" was cut from the first Fifty Shades of Grey film where Christian Grey removes Anastasia Steele's tampon before having sex , to which director Sam Taylor-Thompson says the scene was never even discussed.

Question Time: Men On Menstruation

Perhaps not entirely surprisingly, there's a lot of misinformation out there when it comes to periods. And though you might expect that men would be the only ones that are sometimes misinformed, women can also believe in period myths, particularly if they were passed down from old sisters, moms, aunts, or grandmothers who learned them before them. Still, there are some surprising things men think about periods , potentially because, all too often, they're never really taught about periods , as a study published in the Journal of Family Issues found. They just pick information up wherever they can find it, be it from siblings, parents, friends, or romantic partners.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: How much do men know about periods? - #JustATampon

Welcome to Glamour UK. This site uses cookies to improve your experience and deliver personalised advertising. You can opt out at any time or find out more by reading our cookie policy. If you've never experienced a period for yourself, the concept of bleeding from a hole in between your legs must be pretty damn bewildering. So we can't really blame those with a penis and lack of ovaries for not having much understanding about the menstrual cycle. In fact, it's actually pretty fun mentioning things like period pants , menstrual cups and blood clots in public just to see the puzzled expression of a nearby male.

What do men know about periods?

If you're about to live with a dude — a housemate, a lover, anybody — and are going to be sharing a bathroom, you may want to give them this list of basic pointers about what happens to your body once a month. Because without a little education, you may end up getting some questions that leave you with a blank face and them with a red one. And these were not from young, callow youths. Of course, you may have been blessed with a life full of dudes who fully understand periods , but some of them — from bosses to family members — still have strange misconceptions about what the monthly menstrual cycle actually is and how it works. Underlying assumptions about periods are widespread because, as a culture, we still get a bit freaked out by talking about it openly.

Jun 6, - Women will roll their eyes when they read this, but we're amazed at how many guys don't actually know what menstruation entails. If you do, go.

You probably learned the basics back in middle school health class: Every month, a woman bleeds. Follow this guide and see what we mean. If you do, go ahead and skip to the next section. During the course of her menstrual cycle, this lining plumps up to prepare to nourish a fertilized egg.

7 Surprising Things Men Think About Periods

Michael Richards does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment. Menstruation is associated with smells, mess, blood, gore, impurity and disgust. Which is probably why many women say they feel uncomfortable talking about their periods.

Guys, 7 things you should know about periods!

Periods: what are they? But for so many cis men, the details of what exactly happens to the human body when it menstruates remains a mystery. It does play with your hormones , and it can be pretty uncomfortable. To educate them, we spoke to Dr.

This discussion is vital in order to erase misconceptions about menstruation and could help further education throughout the world. This mentality could erase negative mentalities and improve the health for women throughout the world.

How much pre-warning do you get? Technically, periods are meant to work on a monthly cycle, meaning that you should be able to count a certain number of days in your diary and know the day that they'll arrive. Funnily enough, women's bodies don't run like the average bus schedule, so they can turn up a few days early, a few days later, all month, or in times of stress or exertion, not at all. However, our bodies do tend to give us a few warning signs — greasier hair, changes in mood, and cramps all tend to make their presence known before the actual blood. The answer to this depends on both the woman and the day of her cycle, but the truth is, it can get pretty gnarly.

We answered the top 10 questions men have about periods to set the record straight

But what about men? When it comes to periods, is the average cismale becoming more enlightened, or are they still left in the dark? We asked five men of diverse ages and backgrounds just how much they understand about life with periods. From vagueness about what periods are actually for to squeamishness at the sight of blood, anecdotal evidence would suggest that plenty of confusion still exists. Nearly 30 years later, the experience of year-old Rick from Surrey was slightly more informed, if not exactly enlightened. If you wanted to insult someone then you used the word period.

What Men Think About Menstruation

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