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Can i get bv from my boyfriend cheating

As many women will know, having sex can trigger a bout of bacterial vaginosis, or BV, and recurring BV can really spoil the mood for you. BV is one of the most common vaginal conditions it is estimated to affect one in three of us , yet not many people have heard of it — in fact, symptoms of bacterial vaginosis are often confused with a yeast infection or thrush symptoms. BV is probably the last thing you want to be thinking about during sex, but if you are prone to recurring BV and sex might trigger your bacterial vaginosis symptoms, then there are some things you can do to help reduce the chances of developing BV after sex. As well as protecting you from STIs it will help prevent semen from entering the vagina.

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Finally cured Recurring BV. It was my boyfriend all along.

Data are available from the Alfred Hospital Ethics Committee for researchers who meet the criteria for access to confidential information, due to restrictions outlined in the consent form. Interested researchers may contact Kordula Dunscombe of the Alfred Hospital Ethics Committee if they would like access to the data ua. Bacterial vaginosis BV is the most common vaginal infection affecting women of childbearing age. While the aetiology and transmissibility of BV remain unclear, there is strong evidence to suggest an association between BV and sexual activity.

A descriptive, social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study. Thirty five women of varying sexual orientation who had experienced recurrent BV in the past five years took part in semi-structured interviews. The majority of women predominantly reported sexual contact triggered the onset of BV and sexual and non-sexual factors precipitated recurrence.

The majority of women did not think BV was a sexually transmitted infection however many reported being informed this by their clinician.

Single women who attributed BV onset to sex with casual partners were most likely to display self-blame tendencies and to consider changing their future sexual behaviour.

Women who have sex with women WSW were more inclined to believe their partner was responsible for the transmission of or reinfection with BV and seek partner treatment or change their sexual practices. Findings from this study strongly suggest women believe that BV onset is associated with sexual activity, concurring with epidemiological data which increasingly suggest BV may be sexually transmitted.

Exacerbating factors associated with recurrence were largely heterogeneous and may reflect the fact it is difficult to determine whether recurrence is due to persistent BV or a new infection in women. There was however evidence to suggest possible transmission and reinfection among WSW, reinforcing the need for new approaches to treatment and management strategies including male and female partner treatment trials.

Bacterial vaginosis BV is a highly prevalent vaginal condition affecting women of reproductive age and has been associated with serious sequelae including miscarriage, preterm delivery and increased risk of sexually transmitted infections STIs and human immunodeficiency virus HIV [ 1 — 5 ].

While the causative agents and transmission of BV remains unclear, there is strong evidence of an association between BV and sexual activity [ 7 , 15 , 17 , 18 ].

Epidemiological studies have shown BV to be associated with sexual risk behaviours that typify STIs including new or multiple sexual partners, symptomatic female sexual partners, inconsistent or lack of condom use and penile-vaginal sex [ 7 , 17 , 19 — 22 ]. High frequency of sex [ 23 ] and young age of first sex [ 6 , 24 ] have also been associated with an increased risk of BV.

In a study of 17 to 21 year old female university students in Australia, researchers found BV was absent in women with no history of sexual activity, uncommon in women with a history of non-coital activity only and associated with penile-vaginal sex [ 18 ].

Consistent condom use and male circumcision have also been shown to be associated with a reduced risk of BV [ 25 , 26 ], and while there is no clinical correlate of BV in men, many of the BV-associated bacteria have been detected in the coronal sulcus and distal urethra in males and detection has been associated with sexual activity and lack of circumcision [ 27 ]. Epidemiological studies have also found a number of ethnic, lifestyle and non-sexual behavioural factors including douching, smoking, stress and non-white ethnicity to be associated with BV [ 19 , 28 — 31 ] however whether these are causally associated or confounders is not clear.

Despite the emerging epidemiological evidence, the difficulties in establishing the aetiology of BV and the failure of a number of male partner treatment trials to reduce recurrence in women [ 32 , 33 ], it is not clear if sexual transmission of BV is occurring. Current international guidelines therefore do not characterise BV as an STI and do not recommend partner treatment [ 34 , 35 ], hence women are informed by their treating clinicians that BV is not sexually transmitted.

Detailed methods for this study have been outlined in an earlier paper [ 15 ]. This study has been reported in accordance with the Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research COREQ guidelines [ 36 ]. A social constructionist approach was chosen as the framework for the study.

Semi-structured interviews were chosen to allow women the opportunity to tell their lived experiences and personal realities of recurrent BV while also allowing for the exploration of key clinical areas of interest. Women 18 to 45 years, who had experienced two or more diagnosed episodes of BV in the past five years and had a good understanding of verbal and written English were eligible for the study.

Women were purposively sampled to allow for a broad sample of women including heterosexual and WSW including women identifying as bi-sexual, lesbian, queer, pansexual and transgender , single women and women in a relationship, women who had experienced high and low numbers of recurrent BV and women from a number of recruitment locations. Participants had the option of being interviewed either by telephone or face to face at MSHC or in their own home.

Participants interviewed face to face at MSHC were provided with a written plain language statement PLS and consent form to read and sign. Participants interviewed by telephone were read aloud the PLS and consent form and asked to provide verbal consent. Verbal consent was obtained for telephone interviews as it was not practical to obtain written consent for this method of interview.

This process of written and verbal consent was approved by the Alfred Hospital Ethics Committee. After obtaining informed consent, women were asked a series of 15 structured demographic, sexual behaviour and diagnosis and treatment questions before being asked open ended questions pertaining to their knowledge of BV prior to their first episode, their first and recurrent experiences of BV, the impact of BV on them emotionally, socially, sexually and in their work lives, their beliefs around the causes and triggers of BV, their use of self-help remedies and their experience of antibiotic treatment and the clinical management of BV.

All data was collected in a once-off interview and no women required re-interviewing. Thematic analysis [ 37 ] was undertaken and data coded using primarily a segmented approach [ 38 ]. Transcripts were imported into N-Vivo 9 for data management and a subset of transcripts reviewed independently by two other research team members to cross check coding and themes MTS, SW. Analyses of demographic, sexual behaviour and diagnosis and treatment data were conducted using SPSS Of the 40 women who were referred to or registered their interest in the study, 35 completed an interview, 3 were ineligible after eligibility was checked again prior to organising an interview and 2 could not be contacted.

Contact details only were collected on women who did not participate. Participant demographics are shown in Table 1. The psychosocial impacts of recurrent BV have been reported in a previous paper [ 15 ]. The majority of women predominantly reported sexual triggers for the onset of BV and both sexual and non-sexual factors associated with recurrence. The five main sexual triggers for BV onset identified by women were sex with a regular female partner, sex with a regular male partner, sex with a new male or female partner, sex with an uncircumcised male partner and condom-less sex with a male partner.

Table 2 provides example quotes of the factors women think triggered BV onset. Interestingly, a few women reported BV onset following sex with a new partner however did not overtly make an association between BV onset and sexual contact with that partner.

In general, sex workers were less certain about their triggers for disease onset and did not attribute BV onset to work related sexual activity. Only one of the six sex workers felt BV onset may have been triggered by digital sex with clients, while another reported it had occurred as a result of sex with an uncircumcised personal male partner.

The remaining three sex workers could not identify any triggers for BV onset. I was a working girl, nothing different, like to what I usually do, it just occurred Participant 30, age WSW were more likely than heterosexual women to strongly feel their current or previous female sexual partner was responsible for the transmission of BV.

Of 16 WSW in the study, over half reported they experienced BV onset or a new episode of BV following sex with a new female partner or sex with an untreated female partner with BV. The remaining women either reported BV onset following sexual contact with a male partner or were unsure of the trigger for BV onset.

Of the four WSW who identified as bisexual, two reported BV onset following sex with a new male partner and new episodes with new female partners. Both women suspected their previous partners had been responsible for the transmission of BV. Of the remaining two bisexual women, one attributed BV onset to a female sexual partner and the other was unsure of the trigger for BV onset. Among WSW, a couple reported their previous partner had BV when they were first diagnosed or their most recent or current partner had since been diagnosed with BV.

Participant 34, age Participant 14, age The five main non-sexual exacerbating factors were menstruation or the use of sanitary products, exercise, tight clothing, stress or a poor immune system. Menstruation was the most often cited exacerbating factor. To a lesser extent, women also mentioned various sexual behaviours such as frequent sex, unprotected sex or oral sex, the use of lubricant or latex based products such as condoms or gloves could exacerbate symptoms of BV.

Among WSW a couple of women strongly felt their partner had been responsible for the transmission and recurrence of BV, reporting they had experienced no further episodes since their female partner had been treated for BV or they had broken up with that particular partner.

I wondered then why I kept getting it back! Once she was treated it was fine Participant 4, age A couple of other WSW said they continued to experience recurrences often at the same time as their ongoing partner. Yes we do tend to get it at the same time which is why we refrain from oral sex or any sharing of, not that we ever share toys anyway, but yes, we do notice it Participant 3, age Table 3 provides example quotes of the exacerbating factors associated with the recurrence of symptoms.

When asked directly by the interviewer, the majority of women reported they did not think BV was an STI even if they felt BV resulted from sexual contact or they felt a sexual partner was responsible for transmission or reinfection. Not necessarily sexually contracted but definitely her flora affected mine Participant 6, age I think he might carry BV… Participant 17, age How did this happen? It was common for women to feel a sense of shame around their BV recurrences due to the embarrassment they felt about their symptoms and the social stigma associated with the symptoms of vaginal conditions and more broadly STIs.

While most women felt embarrassed about their symptoms of BV—which impacted on various aspects of their lives [ 15 ]—some women were more likely to blame themselves for acquisition than others. A few single women and women in relationships who felt that poor health and wellbeing choices might be contributing factors to their recurring BV also showed a degree of self-blame, however to a far lesser extent.

In comparison, women in relationships tended not to blame themselves or their partners for BV acquisition, even though many felt certain their partner had been responsible for transmission or reinfection. WSW in particular were very open in their discussions and attempts with partners to prevent further recurrences, particularly if their partner had also experienced BV. And we tried that and then we got it back again.

So we were sort of trying different thing just ourselves too! Participant 4, age While these women commonly felt their BV was triggered by sexual contact, they were more inclined to view it as a by-product of sexual contact rather than as a consequence of their sexual or lifestyle behaviours or choices.

Sex workers were also less inclined to blame themselves for the acquisition of BV even if they felt sexual contact may have been a contributing factor. For others however, being informed BV was not an STI just left them with a sense of confusion—and still for some a lingering sense of shame—particularly if in their experience their recurrences were triggered or exacerbated by sexual contact or certain sexual behaviours.

As part of the study we explored possible differences in the experiences of heterosexual women and WSW, single women and women in a relationship and sex industry workers and non-sex industry workers.

Differences have been reported previously [ 15 ] however in relation to the data presented in this paper, we found that sex workers were generally less certain of their triggers for disease onset and less likely to display self-blame tendencies or question their role in acquisition.

There were no major differences in the experiences of bi-sexual women and women identifying as lesbian, queer, transgender or pansexual, other than bisexual women were more likely to report first episode BV was triggered by a male sexual partner. The majority of women in this study predominantly reported sexual triggers for the onset of BV, including sex with a regular female partner, sex with a regular male partner, sex with a new male or female partner, sex with an uncircumcised male partner and condom-less sex with a male partner, factors which have shown to be associated with an increased risk of BV [ 7 , 17 , 19 , 20 , 22 , 23 , 25 ].

Importantly, over half of WSW reported BV onset following sex with a new female partner or a female partner with BV, with a number firmly believing their partner was responsible for transmission. These data are consistent with recent findings from a cohort study of Australian WSW which found women with a new female sexual partner or female partner with BV are significantly more likely to have BV [ 39 ].

Exacerbating factors attributed to recurrence were less clear and included a range of sexual and non-sexual factors, reflecting the likely heterogeneous nature of recurrence which may reflect a new episode of infection in some cases, or a re-emergence of symptoms from persistent infection in others. This finding is also consistent with past data which have found women who are with the same partner pre and post treatment are 2—3 times more likely to experience BV recurrence [ 16 , 40 ].

Interestingly, despite the majority of women reporting BV onset following sexual contact most women did not believe BV was an STI even if they strongly felt their partner was responsible for the transmission of BV. Clinicians are guided by current treatment guidelines for the management of BV, which do not report BV as an STI, nor recommend male or female partner treatment [ 34 , 35 ].

It is not surprising women feel confused and unsure about the nature of BV when in their experience sexual contact seems to have triggered BV or recurrences and yet they are informed it is not an STI. While not currently termed an STI, BVs sexual, recurring nature means it is not uncommon for women to feel a similar sense of shame and stigma as that associated with an STI diagnosis [ 15 , 41 , 42 ].

This results from the stigma around the type of people who contract STIs—women who are deviant, dirty, immoral and sexually promiscuous [ 43 — 48 ]—which often leads to feelings of shame and guilt when women contract an STI themselves [ 43 ]. Shame in turn induces self-blame, particularly if someone believes they had control over the situation [ 43 ].

It is not surprising therefore that single women in this study were more likely to exhibit self-blame tendencies given they attributed their BV to their sexual behaviour choices—something they had control over. Similar to our study, past research has also found that women in committed relationships often experience less self-blame following an STI diagnosis as their relationship and support of their partners provided a protective affect against moral judgment and feelings of shame and self-blame [ 46 , 49 , 50 ].

STD Awareness: Is Bacterial Vaginosis a Sexually Transmitted Disease?

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Bacterial vaginosis BV is an infection caused by having too much of a certain type of bacteria in the vagina. The vagina naturally maintains a balance of lactobacilli, which are beneficial bacteria. These are often referred to as the vaginal flora or microbiota.

What's hard to diagnose, hard to treat, affects 10 to 15 per cent of Australian women — and could turn out to be sexually transmissible? While this is early research, circumcision appears to be linked to a reduction of these bacteria in men. Studies also suggest that women who are treated for BV may have high rates of recurrence because they are re-infected after sex with their partner after treatment. BV is distressing for women on many counts.

Can Men Get or Spread Bacterial Vaginosis?

Bacterial vaginosis BV is the most common cause of unusual vaginal discharge. One in three people with a vagina get it at some time. People who have bacterial vaginosis have:. Hormonal changes during the menstrual cycle, receiving oral sex, semen in the vagina after sex without a condom, an intrauterine contraceptive device IUD and genetic factors may also play a part. If you think you may have it, talk to a doctor or nurse who might recommend a test if you have signs and symptoms. You may notice these yourself or they may be noticed by a doctor or nurse during a vaginal examination. You may be offered a test during pregnancy if you have symptoms. You should be offered a test before some gynaecological procedures and before an abortion.

did my boyfriends cheating give me BV

Posted 22 months ago , 3 users are following. The first time I got BV I have no idea how or exactly why. I was being treated for a kidney infection and ended up with BV which I had never heard of. That was over 2 years ago.

Having multiple sex partners increases the risk of bacterial vaginosis — an imbalance of vaginal bacteria that can cause pain and itching in women — but a new study suggests that being faithful to one partner may cause the infection to recur. Women in the study who were treated for bacterial vaginosis BV were about twice as likely to experience a recurrence if they had sexual intercourse with the same partner before and after treatment, compared to women who had a new sexual partner, or no partner, after treatment.

She was diagnosed by her doctor with bacterial vaginosis BV , a complicated condition that's difficult to diagnose, harder to treat, and profoundly affects the health and wellbeing of Australian women. In fact, it is the leading cause of abnormal vaginal discharge in women of reproductive age. When the BV returned after she resumed sexual activity, Jessica was prescribed antibiotics which in turn led to a case of thrush a yeast infection caused by the overgrowth of Candida albicans yeast. I hadn't had any symptoms before we had sex and you're brand new'.

Did he cheat on me??

Data are available from the Alfred Hospital Ethics Committee for researchers who meet the criteria for access to confidential information, due to restrictions outlined in the consent form. Interested researchers may contact Kordula Dunscombe of the Alfred Hospital Ethics Committee if they would like access to the data ua. Bacterial vaginosis BV is the most common vaginal infection affecting women of childbearing age. While the aetiology and transmissibility of BV remain unclear, there is strong evidence to suggest an association between BV and sexual activity.

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The Most Common Vaginal Infection Is Not What You Think

The content here can be syndicated added to your web site. Print Version pdf icon. Bacterial vaginosis BV is a condition that happens when there is too much of certain bacteria in the vagina. This changes the normal balance of bacteria in the vagina. Researchers do not know the cause of BV or how some women get it.

Last night my bf and I had sex 2 times we had not had sex for one week before last You can get BV just because; it doesn't mean your BF cheated on you.

Gardnerella vaginalis under a microscope. Image: K. Bacterial vaginosis, or BV, is the most common vaginal infection among people 15 to 44 years of age.

What Is Bacterial Vaginosis?

Bacterial vaginosis is a common vaginal infection that can be caused by a bacterial imbalance in the vagina or transmitted through sexual contact. And it's surprisingly prevalent among pregnant women: Sixteen percent of expectant mothers in the United States have bacterial vaginosis. There's a careful balance between the good and bad bacteria that live in the vagina, and when that balance is disrupted, bacterial vaginosis can occur.

Bacterial Vaginosis – CDC Fact Sheet

Bacterial vaginosis BV is an infection in the vagina. Males cannot develop bacterial vaginosis, but they can spread the infection. People with BV can get symptoms that include excess and discolored discharge from the vagina.

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For many women, a yeast infection is the first thing that comes to mind when you think about what can go wrong with the vagina. Yet oftentimes, it's an overgrowth of bacteria, not yeast, that causes an infection and the unpleasant symptoms that come along with it. Bacterial vaginosis, or BV, is the most common vaginal infection in women ages 15 to They live in perfect harmony, along with yeast, maintaining the vagina's pH and healthy ecosystem. Problems arise when something disturbs the natural balance of microbes in the vagina and the "harmful" bacteria begin to outnumber the "good" bacteria.

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Comments: 1
  1. Zolole

    I join. So happens. We can communicate on this theme. Here or in PM.

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