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Looking for girlfriend > 50 years > Where did the phrase i need to see a man about a horse come from

Where did the phrase i need to see a man about a horse come from

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I always heard it as " I've got to see a man about a dog". Not many horses around where I lived I suppose. And as for titbits There was a magazine in England called Titbits, a sort of gossip magazine I think. Loved reading this

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THE MEANINGS OF SOME OLD ENGLISH SAYINGS

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I always heard it as " I've got to see a man about a dog". Not many horses around where I lived I suppose. And as for titbits There was a magazine in England called Titbits, a sort of gossip magazine I think. Loved reading this I, too, have heard it as "I have to see a man about a horse.

Warmest smiles to you as the weekend approaches. I've heard it said about a horse and about a dog. My mother used the expression fairly often. Not much was any of my business. I only knew Sue's explanation: excuse oneself to go the bathroom. But only men! Mind you, I've heard many expressions to that purpose over the years thanks to working in a male-oriented environment.

All equally weird and wonderful. That's a new one for me. I've heard "I've got to see a man about a horse", too. It could have meant anything, but where I'm from it mostly meant you wanted to leave where you were or you had to go to the bathroom. The men in my family always used the "horse" or the "dog. Being the only lady in a house full of "not-so-gentlemanly" men must have been a trial for her.

But, on the other hand, she pretty much ruled the roost, so to speak. Post a Comment. Did you forget we were speaking of old idioms?! I am truly saddened. Both of us had English-born grandfathers, and both of us lived with them for a time. Both grandfathers used the phrase. In my grandfather's context, at least the way that I perceived it, the saying meant: "I have something to attend to, and it's none of your business.

So, who got it right? It turns out that we both did, for the Urban Dictionary lists both definitions. Of course, I humbly note that my version is listed first. This thrills me to me end as I am not used to coming in first. Thankfully however, I am mollified to know that "the last shall be first" on that somewhat postponed meeting in the sky. These are direct quotes from the answers provided.

Some of these answers referred to other internet sources. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr.

Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog. The most common variation is to "see a man about a horse". Almost any noun can be substituted as a way of giving the hearer a hint about one's purpose in departing. During Prohibition in the United States, the phrase was most commonly used in relation to the consumption or purchase of alcoholic beverages.

This has been a useful and usefully vague excuse for absenting oneself from company for about years, though the real reason for slipping away has not always been the same. Of these reasons [ I have used the phrase from time to time, but it doesn't seem to work all that well in the present day, and I haven't used it extensively.

Perhaps I will try harder though, as I like it. Posted by Anvilcloud at am. Newer Post Older Post Home. Subscribe to: Post Comments Atom.

The Origins of 12 Horse-Related Idioms

Origin is unclear. It is often stated in the sources that the meaning seems to be paradoxical, as horses do not eat voraciously or greedily. They eat hay and they eat it slowly. But this is a common feature of idioms - they are often paradoxical, the meaning sometimes being the exact opposite the literal interpretation of the words. Animals , Food , Horse.

Hold your horses! This idiom is so old that when St. In the 17th century, sailors were paid in advance and promptly blew their checks on booze.

Wife sarcastically to husband, who is late again —Been to see a man about a dog, I suppose? Husband—Absolutely right. That confounded tyke of yours has bitten the postman. The phrase to see a man about a dog is used euphemistically as a vague excuse for leaving to keep an undisclosed appointment , or, now frequently, to go to the toilet. A Magazine of Politics, Literature, and Art London of 15 th November —here, the husband uses the phrase as an excuse to absent himself from the marital home:.

meaning and origin of the phrase ‘to see a man about a dog’

Listen on SoundCloud. Hint: The answer she gets should tide her over. A caller complains that this last word gives him the willies. Does an alligator alligate? Charny A former West Virginian reports that she grew up hearing a strange word: charny. Martha and Grant discuss such sesquipedalian contenders for the title of Longest English Word. For the rest of that list of long words that Martha mentioned, check out AskOxford. Punctuation and Quotation Marks Where do you put those exclamation points and question marks— do they go inside or outside the quotation marks?

Seeing a man about a horse

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. It seems possibly to be a humorous way to get out of a conversation. Even as a native English speaker, I've never figured out the exact situation you would use this phrase.

Before I left, Weiner [one of the two editors of the OED] said he remembered how baffled he had been the first time he heard an Australian talk about the 'arvo'.

Idioms are those phrases that mean more than the sum of their words. Which made us wonder: what are their favorite idioms in their own tongue? Below, we asked translators to share their favorite idioms and how they would translate literally. The results are laugh-out-loud funny.

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Top definition. See a man about a horse unknown. It means to politely excuse yourself from a situation to go to the restroom or buy a drink. It originated from men disappearing to go bet on horse or dog races.

Below is a list of old sayings and where they came from. However, sometimes it is impossible to say for certain how an old saying originated. Sometimes we can only give the most likely explanation. Anyone who was immersed in the river became invulnerable. However, Thetis held Achilles by his heel. Since her hand covered this part of his body the water did not touch it and so it remained vulnerable.

Definition of see a man about a horse

Your browser does not support the audio element. Colleague 1 : Where are you going? Colleague 2 : What you do not know cannot hurt you. Better that you do not know. Then you have plausible deniability. Friend 1 : After three beer in less than one hour, I need to go see a man about a horse.

Nov 9, - “You did. You told me you had to go see a man about a dog.” “Well, I might have said that,” he said.

Last edited on Feb 15 Excuse me, I have to go see a man about a horse. See more words with the same meaning: to go to the bathroom.

see-a-man-about-a-horse

To see a man about a dog or horse is an English idiom, usually used as a way to apologize for one's imminent departure or absence—generally to euphemistically conceal one's true purpose, such as going to use the toilet or going to buy a drink. The original non-facetious meaning was probably to place or settle a bet on a racing dog. The earliest confirmed publication is the Dion Boucicault play Flying Scud [2] in which a character knowingly breezes past a difficult situation saying, "Excuse me Mr. Quail, I can't stop; I've got to see a man about a dog.

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